Scary Stories: A Training Ground to Endure Discomfort

Horror, Suspense, Terror; let’s face it, we love scary stories. We even designate special times, (Halloween), and places, (Camp Fires, Hay Rides, Haunted Houses) to enhance these spine tingling tales. And it isn’t just stories; we go out of our way to experience fear. The longest lines at amusement parks can always be found at the scariest roller coasters and horror movies are sure bets at the box office. WHY? Are we a masochistic society or is there a reason we crave experiences that terrify us?

horror
Some might suggest that these scary entertainments stimulate our adrenaline and give us a rush, but I think there is a higher purpose. We are rational creatures and fear tells us to avoid perceived dangers, unfortunately new and unknown things feel strange and can be perceived as dangerous. If we allowed fear to direct our actions, we would never venture out of our safe space or dare to create new things. Scary stories allow us to experience fearful emotions without putting us in harm’s way.
Zombies, demons, and vampires can come at us through stories while we sit in the dark only warmed by a flickering flame. Our hearts may race, we might ever shiver, but we will survive. We’ll watch Psycho and scream, but we’ll continue to munch on our popcorn. Then the next day we just might ask for a raise, apply for a job, or submit art work to be judged. Last night we survived the ax murder so today we can risk rejection.
Remember, stories are sticky. They will hang around in your memory when facts and rationalizations disappear. You’ll remember the fear, but if you are smart and choose the right stories, you’ll also remember surviving.
So, is there a good scary and a bad scary? I think so. Scary stories help train us to endure discomfort and face risk, however they can also break down our defenses and convince us to avoid risks. If the story ends with survival and a sense of hope, the listeners, (and the teller) will internalize these ending values. If on the other hand, the story ends with death and devastation, we might internalize those outcomes. This is different than a tragedy, which often appeals to our intellects. Stories of terror just like the roller coaster stimulate primitive instincts and may act as an emotional training center.
Ultimately trust your gut. Be conscience of your reactions during and after the tale is told. If you walk away from a horror story, a zombie movie, or frightening novel feeling disoriented and raw, that scary experience might have caused more harm than good. If you feel empowered or exhilarated, you might be ready to take a chance tomorrow.

Tell Your Story for Crowd Funding Success

By Rivka Willick

It’s hard to believe that Crowd Funding has only been around for a little over five years.  Kickstarter, the superstar of crowd funding sites launched on April 28, 2009 and set off the internet trend of raising money through online campaigns.  The first crowd-sourcers focused on innovations and artistic projects. Some projects are modest, like a pre-school teacher seeking funds for art materials for Jackson Pollack-like canvases. Others are large and ambitious such as funding for a film or complex video game. Other platforms soon followed offering charities, individuals in need, entrepreneurs, inventors, and just about anybody with a project a place to pitch their need or idea.

Here’s how crowd funding works.  A person posts a project and asks the public for financial support. Some sites, like Kickstarter, require the poster to meet their stated goal, if they don’t raise enough money, they don’t get any.  Other sites like Indiegogo and Rockethub allows you to keep the money you raise (minus their fees) even if you don’t reach your goal.

Sounds great…and it is for some, but many people set up projects and raise little if any money. There are some wildly successful campaigns; The Veronica Mars Movie Project raised $5,702,152 and Star Citizen Video Game raised $68,549,471 on Kickstarter and Ubuntu Edge a “high concept” smartphone raised $12,814,196 on Indiegogo.  Unfortunately most crowdfunding campaigns fail.

Robert Strohmeyer reported in PC World Sept 26, 2013 that only 44 percent of Kickstarter projects and 34 percent of Indiegogo projects meet their goals. Those are sobering statistics, but I haven’t found any stats that examine the success rates of projects that do the ground work and launch with proper preparation and those that don’t.  If you do the ground WORK, and I really do mean work, your chances for success will greatly improve.

Promote your crowdfunding project everywhere you network and speak.

Promote your crowdfunding project everywhere you network and speak.

Improve your chances for Crowd Funding Success.

  1. Research and choose the platform that fits your project. There are dozens of crowdsourcing sites and the biggest is often not the best. Some crowdsources (like Kickstarter) will only give the funds if you meet your goal.  That makes sense if you can’t do the project without the set amount AND you have no other means of getting the balance. Other sites will release the funds raised even if you don’t reach your goal, but they will often take a higher percentage.

Each platform attracts different groups of backers.  If you have an innovative business project you’ll probably want to pass on Kickstarter and Indiegogo because neither have a category for business innovation or ideas.  Rocket Hub does.  There are platforms that appeal to specific groups or causes like Jewcer (Jewish Projects), help individuals and organizations raise money for a cause like FundRazr, and match projects to investors (not supporters) like Onevest.

  1. Tell a Compelling Story – Most projects post a short video and have a brief write up, so you need to connect with possible supporters in less than 3 minutes. As a storycoach I can help you find and form your story and write it up as video script.  Remember, just because you think your product or idea is great doesn’t mean anybody else does. You’ve been developing and dreaming about it for a long time, others haven’t gone through that process.  You must share your enthusiasm and concept in a compelling way—Story is the most powerful and effective means of communicating and connecting on both an intellectual and emotional level.

Your video story can be told with images and music, animation, or verbally.  I’ll be happy to work with you to find a format that will fit your project.

  1. Create Your Own Crowd before the Project Launches – Update your email list and contact friends, family, and fans. Get active on social media and let people know.  Blog about it, pass out flyers at networking events, tack a flyer about it on the company cork board, talk about it when you do presentations, mention it at parties, and talk about the project on your website.  THIS IS ESSENTIAL.  You won’t attract strangers if your friends and fans don’t care.  Early and continual funding keeps projects high up on many platforms.  It also draws attention.  After all, it’s only human nature to be curious in success.
  1. Create an Exciting List of Donor Gift Categories – We all like stuff. It’s fun to be part of art, innovation, or exciting ideas, but it’s even more fun when you get something out of it.  It’s a good idea to set up low, medium, and high price gift categories.  The perks vary each project , try to tie them to your story.  If you are offering products, make sure you have the ability of deliver them In a timely way.  For example, if you’re raising money for a new fashion line and you are offering items from the line as perks, make sure you’ll have the manufacturing capacity and capital to deliver each item in the time frame you post.
  1. Be willing to commit real time and some money to make the campaign a success.

If you’d like to find your story and create a compelling video script for your next crowd sourcing campaign, drop me an email and ask about my crowd sourcing package.  Rivka@simplyextraordinarytales.com

When Stories Herald Reality

The stories we see and tell sometimes mirror the reality we live. It’s usually easy to shrug it off and call it a coincident, or maybe you’re reading too much into it, but there are times when the storyteller and the fortune teller seem to be one in the same.  Our stories often predict the future and tell us truths about the present even if we don’t want to see or admit it.

China Syndrome  Manchurian-Candidate mocking jay

On March 16th, 1970 The China Syndrome was released in the USA. You might remember the movie starring Jane Fonda, Jack Lemon, and Michael Douglas about a cover-up and near disaster at a nuclear power plant.  12 days later radios and television stations across the country delivered dramatic reports about a partial meltdown at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor located outside of Middletown, PA.  This was, (and still is), the most serious accident to occur in an American commercial nuclear power plant.  A malfunctioning valve caused the problem and the nation waited for days to learn if there were disastrous consequences.

I went to see The China Syndrome on March 27th,   just one day before Three Mile Island incident.  I went back two days later on March 29th in a state of disbelief and amazement.  I wonder what affect the movie had on the collective consciousness; a million people experienced the fear of a nuclear meltdown in a power plant by watching a movie and then it happened for real.

Here are the two taglines that promoted The China Syndrome:

“Today, only a handful of people know what it means…Soon you will know.”

“People who know the meaning of “The China Syndrome” are scared.  Soon-you-will-know.”

 

There were no fatalities or major injuries, but the event was the catalyst for major changes in regulations and standards for nuclear power plants.

 

Frank Sinatra starred in The Manchurian Candidate, a movie about a prisoner of war who is brainwashed and then becomes an assassin. The film was released in October 1962.  President John F. Kennedy was shot and killed November 1963, just a little over a year later.  Back in the sixties movies circulated for a year or two after their release so when The Manchurian Candidate naturally finished its run, the rumor spread that it was yanked because of the assassination. People saw the connection between the story and reality and jumped to their own conclusion.  We search for (and create) stories to help us make sense of life events that are often too difficult to embrace head-on.

 

Last night my 18-year-old daughter, Chaya, and I went out to see The Mocking Jay, Part One.  It’s the third movie in the Hunger Games series.  We both read the books and liked the first two movies, so we were excited to see the third. The Hunger Games is about a futuristic society.  The wealthy and powerful Capital controls and oppresses the poorer districts by forcing them to sacrifice a few young people each year to a televised fight with only one victor.  The third movie is about the rebellion.

About 15 or 20 minutes into the movies we see a few of the poorer districts (filled with people of color) forced to watch public executions. A few minutes later we see them fight back.  My daughter turned to me and said “Oh my gosh, it’s just like Ferguson.”  As the movie continued the connection became even clearer.

The Mocking Jay Part 1 came out November 21st and three days later on November 24th the Grand Jury Announced that Officer Darren Wilson would not be charge in the shooting death of Michael Brown. Riots and protests followed.

Once again story became the herald of our reality.

Infusing Story onto Products

STORY is the big new word in marketing & advertising. Stories are sticky-memorable-and people want to hear them. Stories are very old but it sounds like modern marketing gurus have just discovered the concept. Tell the story of your product and you’ll be a multi-millionaire overnight. It sounds simple, and it is…but first you have to understand how stories work and honor their structure. That’s sometimes tricky.
Let’s look at two companies that tried to infuse story into their message, one was more successful than the other.
cocacola

Example #1 – Coke-a-Cola and Santa Clause
Just about everyone in the Western Hemisphere has seen the picture of Jolly Old St. Nick with his snowy white beard and bright red suit holding a bottle of Coke. The image of the soda pop drinking Santa first appeared in 1931, long after Clement Clarke Moore’s famous poem “The Night Before Christmas” in 1823. Images of the red clad gift giver were seen on magazines and books before 1931, but using Santa as product placement was new. Instead of eating a cookie set out by children, he took a moment to refresh. It all fit into the narrative and the branding sizzled. The soda pop just expanded the image of Chris Kringle and created a fresh chapter to a delightful story. Great illustrations and a sense of humor made this branding story a best seller for decades.

My beautiful picture

Example #2 – INOX Watch and the NYFD

August 2014 Vitorinox, a major fashion brand that originally created the Swiss Army Knife, rolled out a new watch. They joined forces with the New York Fire Department and created a flashy event at SIR Stage 37 on West 37th St in Manhattan. They’re hoping to create a branding story using images of the most famous fire fighters in the world to show off the durability of their watch. We heard bag piping firemen and saw dramatic demonstrations of the watch’s durability. The INOX watch kept ticking after a fire engine rolled over it and a washing machine washed it. The durable watch was boiled in a tea pot and froze in a mountain of ice. Lots of wow, but where’s the story?

Stories work because they create connections and give us a sense completion, that’s why they’re memorable. I walked around the party and asked how the FDNY and INOX are connected but got no real answer. “They thought it was a good idea.” “The FDNY wanted to try something new.” Yep that’s what I was told, but that doesn’t make a story. I asked if the firemen were going to be given these durable watches and the Vitorinox spokeswoman said maybe. Images alone are not enough. Don’t get me wrong. I love the image of the watch in the teapot, but it’s just an image. The marketers might be hoping that the watch buying public will create their own story from the images. Sometimes that works but it feels like they just missed creating a branding story that will last for generations.

Santa will always enjoy a Coke during his midnight ride because a complete story with a beginning, middle, and end was set up before the first 1931 image and is remembered every time we see it. The jury is still out about the firefighter’s timepiece.

Natural Tellers

George is the one with the white hair.

George is the one with the white hair.

Everybody is filled with stories, and just about every has at least one or two good stories they enjoy telling, however there are a few folks who I like to call natural tellers. They might tell tales as they sit on the front porch or at the kitchen table, or they spin them as they do surgery or sell products. They love to tell and they seem to have an endless supply spellbinding stories, and most natural tellers seem to be very successful in one or more aspects of their lives.

Qualities of a natural teller:

• They have interesting/exciting lives and/or they come from interesting and exciting families.
• They use their stories as a way to communicate
• They willingly share their stories and allow others to pass them on.
• They are good listeners.

Now let’s meet a natural teller: George W. Appenzeller
George runs a llama farm in Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. He’s in his seventies, has a head of pure white hair, and a smile that conveys a bushel load of encouragement. He takes small groups of kids on treks through the mountains and allows them to discover their inner strength. Challenge Adventures is a non-profit that focuses on kids who have faced trauma, abuse, poverty, and other challenges. He also does a few programs with scouts and other youth groups. I spent a week at the llama farm and in the mountains with a group of girls from Camp CADI, an arts and adventure camp for survivors of sexual abuse.

Caring for llamas and leading wilderness adventures seems to fit the first quality of natural tellers–interesting lives, but for George that’s just the tip of his story iceberg. He served in the military, worked in theater, got a degree in Russian history, then a master’s in social work. He and his wife have traveled the world doing environmental studies and they have a business evaluating the effectiveness of programs. Plus he has a llama farm. OK, he’s interesting.

On the second day of our llama walk in the mountains we all went on a 6 mile hike to a waterfall. After an hour or so, we took a break near a stream. George began to talk about the llamas, plants, and terrain for a couple minutes then rolled right into a story. Once he took a group of scouts with their parents hiking and they set up camp just where we were sitting. George and the other guides suggested moving the tents to higher ground, away from the river. The parents preferred the lower, flatter ground. That night it rained; George and the guides stayed dry, the scouts and their dads got soaked. George told the story with a sparkle in his eye and in a simple matter of fact style. It got a laugh and successfully demonstrated the wisdom of listening to guides (and the people in our lives that have experience and knowledge). No lecture, just a simple story. George uses his stories to communicate.

I got into North Carolina ahead of my group, so I had time to meet and chat with his staff. Natural storytellers are usually very generous with their stories and will tell for hours with no end in sight. I asked permission to tell a couple of George’s stories and he said yes right away. He’s willing to share his stories and pass them on.

Now most of the mountain paths are narrow and we each led a llama, so we walked single file. Mountain paths are rocky and I spent the majority of my time looking at my llama or the uneven path, but every now and again I’d look up and see George walking next to one of the girls, just listening. He didn’t rush people, he listened at their pace. Yep, George is a good listener.

People remember natural tellers because they tend to nourish a place in our consciousness that excites both our hearts and our minds. If you find a natural teller, clear some time in your calendar so you can just sit together and talk.

If you are a natural teller (or you know one), please take note. Natural Tellers tend to tell and not save their stories. A story coach, unlike a writing coach, will honor the spoken word process but still find a way to save these precious stories. Often told stories already have their form, but they are a bit like Jello, they wiggle a bit when you want to save them. Creating a structured time and setting goals is the best way to save stories so they can be passed on.

If you’d like to learn more about George and Challege Adventures check out his website at http://www.challengeadventures.com. I’ll be writing more about Camp CADI in my next blog. Check out this amazing program http://www.safegirlsstronggirls.org/ Both groups do amazing work and rely on donations so if you can, please donate.

 

Learn more about story coaching or schedule a session with me at Rivka@SimplyExtraordinaryTales.com.  

Mention this blog and receive $50 off a 4 session package.

Some Stories are Just Bullies

Some stories can be overwhelming and dominate everything else.

Some stories can be overwhelming and dominate everything else.

We are each filled with 10,000 stories.  We begin collecting stories when we are very young.  Some are tales that we’ve lived, some have been passed down, and some we read, hear, or see.  This constellation of stories becomes our personal tapestry which both guides and defines us. It is colorful, textured, detailed, and complex, but sometimes one or two stories will dominate a story tapestry.  When this happens the rich and exciting tales that help us put our lives in context become obscure and navigating through life can become a painful journey.

These gluttonous stories that try to take over come in different forms. Let’s take a look at where these domineering tales come from and what we can do about them.

A trauma may be a catalyst.   Since traumas are often dramatic and all consuming, it’s no surprise that powerful or loud stories often emerge. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, in and of itself, but as time goes by these bright spots on our story tapestry should merge into the pattern of our life.  Unfortunately the effects of some traumas linger and dominate everything we do.  A death of a child, sexual abuse, bankruptcy, or a terrible accident are examples of life changing events.  Although they will change us, if they redefine us and affect all things, all of the stories that came before and all of the stories that will come after may be distorted.

Both positive and negative labels can also take over. For example a person with a disability is often defined by that disability in all things and it is easy for the individual to see him or herself only as the disability.  A positive label can be just as bad.  The prettiest girl in high school is often discounted, chased, and hated all at the same time.  If the beauty label sticks, all of her stories and memories may be tarnished as time goes by.

Sometimes an event redefines a person.  For example October 14, 2003 Steve Bartman sat in the first row of seats in Wrigley Field for Game 6 of the National League Championship series; Chicago Cubs faced the Florida Marlins.  He reached out to catch a foul ball and deflected it from left fielder Mosises Alou.  It cost them the game and the series.  He has been called the most hated fan in baseball.  That happened a decade ago.  It’s the sort of label that can overwhelm, but Bartman took action to play down the event, avoid interviews and move forward.

One or two stories should not dominate our lives.  That fact might seem obvious, but dealing with the gluttonous story can feel overwhelming.  Here are a few suggestions for cutting those stories down to the right size.

  • Don’t go it alone: Seek out a story coach or friends to help you.
  • Give your other stories time to be seen and heard. Work with a storyteller to reclaime them.
  • Small stories are valuable gems, don’t overlook them.
  • If your domineering story sneaks into most or all of your stories, try to retell them, removing that story element.

Learn more about story coaching or schedule a session with me at Rivka@SimplyExtraordinaryTales.com.  

Mention this blog and receive $50 off a 3 session package.

 

Finding the Story

An Incident is not a story.  Something happens and you talk about it, that’s an anecdote.  If you simply restate it, it might be a plot or a news report, but it’s not a story.  It’s a bit like saying a skeleton is a person when in reality there is no life in the skeleton without muscle, flesh, and blood.

An incident or event is a launch pad for a story; it’s actually a launch pad for many stories, and your intentions, feelings, and characters will determine just which story will emerge.  Individuals infuse meaning, events do not determine story.

Let me give you an example:

A 20 year old goes to a party, decides not to drink, drives home, then he gets into an accident and calls his dad.  That’s the event, but it can inspire many stories.  Here are a few.

Story #1 – A 20 year old goes to a party and decides not to drink.  There’s a lot of peer pressure and he’s called a slew of names but laughs them off. He’s offered a couple mixed drinks, but refuses them.  He’s tempted and almost gives in, but doesn’t.  He leaves the party a little early and heads home.  When he’s half way home he hits a patch of black ice, loses control of the car, and hits a tree.  He calls his dad and gets the car towed to their mechanic.  Now he keeps a picture of the dented front end of the car in his wallet.  It reminds him that sometimes doing the right thing has its own rewards.

Story #2 – A 20 year old goes to a party and decides not to drink.  He was hoping to meet up with some friends but they never show.  The party just seems to drag on and on so he leaves a little early.  The weather is nasty and he just wants to get home and crawl into bed. When  he’s about half way home he spots a patch of black ice up a head.  His first thought is to swerve around it, but instead he hits the breaks, and regrets his action the second his foot depresses the pedal as the car begins to spin totally out of control.  Suddenly things seem to slow down and move in slow motion.  He wants to do something, but all he can do is watch the scenery through his window until the front end of his car collides with an oak tree.  He sits still for a minute, until he realizes he’s holding his breath.  He takes a deep inhalation and begins to shake. It takes him a few minutes before he reaches into his pocket and takes out his cell. Then it takes him a few more minutes before he calls his dad. He sat staring straight ahead; it was as if time just stopped until he heard a wrapping on the window.  He turned towards the noise and heard his dad’s voice which seemed to reset the clock.  Time began again.

 Story #3 – A 20 year old goes to a party and decides not to drink. The weather is nasty so he decides to head home early.  When he’s half way home he hits a patch of black ice and spins out of control and collides with a tree.  He sits in the car for a few minutes before he pulls out his cell to call his dad. His dad had always been there for him as a kid, but things changed when he started high school.  He didn’t have much time for his dad and his dad didn’t seem to have much time for him.  College took even more time, but as he sat staring at the trunk of an old oak tree, he couldn’t think of calling anybody but his dad.  His voice quivered a little when he said hello and his dad knew something happened right away, but he waited and just listened.  He closes his cell phone and suddenly his dad appears.  He helps his son get out of the car and they go through some logistics. It isn’t until their home that he realizes that his dad never asked about the party.  He just trusted him.

 

That’s three very different stories.  One is about courage, the second is about trauma, and third is character driven about relationships.  All three stories came from the same event are unique. Infusing story into an event can heal, brand, or inspire. Work with a story coach to plant and harvest your stories.

Getting Unstuck: Taking your Art to the Next Level

We all get bogged down, stalled, blocked. Musicians, painters, writers, performers: all artists get stuck.  It often happens after a success and a burst of productivity. Other times it happens after a well deserved break or vacation. We tend to stall right at a time when we’re ready to surge forward.  That’s when things stop.

It’s a lot like driving a car and getting stuck in the mud.  You’ve been zooming along, making good time when the tires get swallowed by soft, supple mud.  It’s wet and unformed.  If it was in a farmer’s field you might call it fertile land, but it’s part of the road so now it’s a major headache.  You spin your wheels in an attempt at freedom, but you just sink deeper. Maybe you get out of the car and get the shovel from the trunk, (I always carry a shovel in my trunk) and try to dig yourself out.  Unfortunately there is a lot of mud.  Whatever mud you dig out is instantly replaced by other mud.

Finally you decide you can’t do this alone.  You need help. The first person to walk by just got their driver’s permit. They suggest gunning the motor.  Now you realize you not only need help, but you need help from somebody who knows how to get out of the mud. You look around and find somebody who lives in the area.  He tells you he’s been stuck in a similar mud hole just down the block.  He puts cardboard under the tires and tells you to gently move back and forth and then he pushes. It doesn’t happen right away, it takes some time but together you move out of the mud and return to the road.

It’s the same for artists.  We often get stuck when things are fertile and we get frustrated. Sometimes we work really hard, {spinning our wheels} and just get more stuck.  Maybe we’ll go for the shovel and logically try to move forward,but if you don’t know how to handle the mud, more will just replace it.

So, you got to find somebody to help, somebody who knows about being stuck. I suggest a story coach.  She knows how to listen and guide you through the story that’s build a wall around you.  Maybe a new story will open the door, or maybe owning the beginning or end of the story will move you forward.  A story coach will also listen to the process of your music, painting, sculpture, dance, or performance. As the story unfolds, your art will not only move forward but rise to new levels.

Story coaching can be done in person or online through Skype or Google Hangout. If you are ready to embrace your art and get back to work, please give me a call.

Learn more about story coaching or schedule a session with me at Rivka@SimplyExtraordinaryTales.com.  862-268-4989

Mention this blog and receive $50 off a 3 session package.

Branding is Personal so Own your Own Brand!

By Rivka Willick

I often work with business professionals that struggle with branding.  They work hard on improving their products, skills, and services, but are often lost in the crowd.  They will pour buckets of money into logos, titles, taglines, and web designs only to step away looking like everybody else. Others will spend months or years writing books or creating expensive content rich videos only to turn around and see their slightly altered information promoting another business a few months later.

Why does this happen and why is it so common?  It happens because most people don’t infuse themselves into their branding. Each individual is unique and therefore interesting.  As time passes we become 10,000 stories, each tale making us a bit more complex and intriguing. These stories are an amalgam of life experiences, personal heritage, family legends, imagination, and a wild mix of the culture to which we are constantly exposed.

We are our stories….and that’s a good thing.  Stories are the stickest of all spoken or written communications.  The story format is easy to remember and often hard to forget. It’s the natural branding tool.  Stories also turn bland easily copied information into one-of-a-kind content that will be associated with you and your business.

Let’s say you’re writing an information rich book or video about your area of expertise. Maybe you’ve spent years researching and writing it. Once it’s printed it will only take few minutes to copy and ‘spin’ the contents so it’s technically a different text but has all the same information.  (This can be done with any information thick content). Now let’s say you’re writing the same book or video but you infuse your stories into it.  This not only improves the content by making it easier to comprehend, fun to experience, and memorable but it also infuses your story DNA into the content. It’s easy to recoginze and tough to steal.

This same logic applies to webpages, printed brochures, company names and logos, and marketing materials. When you weave your stories into your content, you will own your brand.

By now you’re probably nodding your head and agreeing, but how do you find the stories?  You can make something up, or maybe dig up a high school essay, but you know that’s not right.  If you are a natural storyteller you might be able to create content on your own, but most professionals know the wisdom of seeking out experts for best results.

I’m a story coach and I help people find their stories.

When they find their stories everything tends to come together. Their branding stands out, writen and video content pops, and communications in general greatly improves.

Story coaching can be done in person or online thorugh Skype or Google Hangout.  It’s time to find your stories so you can stand out from the crowd.

Learn more about story coaching or schedule a session with me at Rivka@SimplyExtraordinaryTales.com.  

Mention this blog and receive $50 off a 3 session package.